Inputs
Knob
The knob is an analog input that changes value based on the angle of the handle. Also known as a potentiometer, the knob is one of the most veratile inputs for smoothly controlling things (such as audio tones, the brightness of LEDs, or variables for mathematical operations).
Input Range
0 - 1000
Components
Note: In most cases, accidentally plugging an input into and output port for a short period of time should not cause anything to be damaged. However, plugging a knob into an output port and twisting it to either end may result in the component component being shorted and no longer functioning. Be careful not to plug the knob into any of the outputs.
Button
The button is a two-state input that changes value based on pressure. Also known as a momentary switch, the button is great for quick on/off operations like starting an automated task at the user's command.
Input Range
0 (unpressed) or 1000 (pressed)
Components
Switch
The switch is a two-state input that can be turned on and off. Since the switch makes it easy to remain in a state, it is most commonly used for controlling the mode that a program is operating in (for example, when the switch is on dance, otherwise when the switch is off sing).
Input Range
0 (off) or 1000 (on)
Components
Temperature Sensor
The temperature sensor is an analog input that changes value based on temperature. Also known as a thermistor.
Input Range
230 at 0°C
500 at 25°C
940 at 100°C
Magnetic Sensor
The magnetic sensor is an analog input that changes value based on the magnetic field. Also known as a Hall effect sensor.
Input Range
...
Light Sensor
The light sensor is an analog input that changes value based on the intensity of light. Also known as a photoresistor, light-dependent resistor (LDR), or CdS photocell.
Input Range
50 (dark) - 800 (bright light)
Slider
Similar to the knob, this slider is an analog input that lets users smoothly control things. The slider moves linearly (instead of rotationally), making it great for both user input as well as sensing movement of physical things.
Input Range
0 - 1000
IR Proximity Sensor
The IR Proximity Sensor allows you to measure the distance to an object over a range of 10-80cm. Since it uses light, the material of the object may affect the distance slightly, but overall this little guy is great for projects where you want to sense how far away something is without actually touching it.
Input Range
...
Joystick
The joystick is a two channel analog input that senses the X and Y values of the thumbstick position. Take a close look and you can see that it's literally made of two tiny potentiometers (knobs) inside to get the X and Y locations.
Input Range
0 - 1000 on each channel
Outputs
LEDs
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are analog outputs that allow you to make things light up. Smoothly control their brightness by setting them as PWM, or easily make them blink by using Tone.
Output Range
0 - 1000 as PWM
0 - 30 as Tone
Piezo Speaker
The Piezo speaker is an audio output that is best controlled by using the Tone output type. Unlike headphone or other common audio speakers, the piezo is particularly well suited for contact applications &emdash; listen to how much louder the sound gets when you tape it to the bottom of a paper cup! Note that you can also drive the speaker at frequencies higher than 1000, but you'll need to use variables and some basic math to achieve that.
Output Range
0 - 10000 as Tone
Vibration Motor
The vibration motor is a haptic output device. It's great for experimenting with notifications, tactile feedback, and subtle communication. Setting it to 1000 as PWM will cause it to forcefully buzz, but smoothly controlling the output can produce more subtle effects (like a beating heart).
Output Range
0 - 1000 as PWM
Servo
Servos are a simple way to make your project interact with the physical world. However, since they require more power, servos must be used through the Servo PowerUp board and its 5V DC supply.
The standard servo is a controllable motor often used with hobbies such as RC airplanes, boats, and cars. Standard servos can only spin ~180 degrees, but allow you to precisely control the angle of the output. Use them to affect all sorts of things in the physical world!
Output Range
50 - 950 as Servo
Components
The continuous rotation servo is a modified version of a standard servo that enables the output to drive continuously in either direction, making it behave like a motor. These are great for driving things that you want to keep going around and around (like wheels, spinning platforms, and conveyor belts), but are not as good for tasks where you want to carefully control the output angle.
Output Range
50 - 950 as Servo
Components
Laser
The Laser is an analog output that shines a beam of very focused red light over large distances. Unlike LEDs and most other common light sources, the light from a Laser is contructed in such a way that it's brightness does not change over distance. This makes Lasers great for pointing at things far away or triggering actions when the beam from a laser is interrupted by an object.
Read the warning label, and don't point Lasers at people!
Output Range
0 - 1000 as PWM

Note: If your laser does not seem to be bright enough or only shows up at close range, it is likely that it needs focused. To focus the Laser, gently twist the end of the unit nearest the output until the red dot is as small as possible when pointed at something far away. Ideally, the lasers included in the extra I/O kit should have been well focused at the factory, but it seems like many of them were not. No worries, just dial it in yourself!
Extensions
The extension is a simple pass-thru wire that allows you to place inputs and outputs farther away from the Teageuduino board. You can also connect multiple extensions together to make even-longer extensions!
Output Range
anything
Advanced
3-pin Connector Specification
Each Input and Output connects to the Teagueduino via a standardized 3-pin miniCT connector.

The pinout for all Teagueduino Inputs and Outputs is:
  •   » 5V (red wire)
  •   » Ground (black wire)
  •   » Blue I/O signal

If you are interested in making your own Teagueduino-compatible inputs/outputs to share or sell, go for it! As long as you use the same connector, the same pinout, can operate at 5 volts, and draw less than 25mA, you are welcome to use the phrase "Teagueduino Compatible I/O" for your components.

Note: No single component should draw more than 25mA to ensure that the Teagueduino board does not surpass the power guidelines for USB. If your component requires significantly more power, consider an additional power supply (such as that which is used with the Servo PowerUp board).
Wiring up your own Inputs
For inputs, the voltage can be anywhere between 0 and 5V and is read as an analog signal. There is a 20k resistor pull-down on each input.

You can connect any sensor to Teagueduino, but to make it full-scale and analog may take a bit of additional circuitry (for example, small signal sensors that need amplification, or digital components that may require filtering or conversion).

For more complex projects, keep in mind that Teagueduino is designed to enable migration to Arduino where digitally reading sensors values is common and is often easily configured in just a couple lines of code using Arduino's included libraries. See Migrating to Arduino and Beyond for more information.
Wiring up your own Outputs
For outputs, the voltage is also between 0 and 5V, but all output is on/off. The different output modes determine how the output is driven to easily work with various hardware. For example, PWM quickly switches between on and off to mimic an analog voltage when smoothed.
Understanding the Teagueduino board
The main Teagueduino board is fairly straight-forward. It is intended to break out various pins on the Teensy++ to standardized connectors for easy hook-up of inputs and outputs.

Additionally, there are LEDs corresponding to each of the board's outputs to give visual feedback to the state of the device. The board is kept as simple and clean as possible (placing filter two caps and two resistor packs under the main baord), and the size has been made small to allow for easily embedding Teagueduino within a user's project.

Every input and output port on the main board uses a simple analog 3-pin interface (+5V, Ground, and Signal) via a MiniCT connector (DigiKey: #A98682-ND, and mating pre-crimped wire #A100193-ND).

Teagueduino is completely open for you to explore, modify, and share. Be sure to check out the schematic and PCB files, as well as DIY Teagueduino instructable for step-by-step instructions if you're interested in building one yourself!